Category Archives: Education

Here’s why law course encourages young aspirants to impact generations

Law is one of the most engaging courses that fascinates a number of young aspirants even before joining the institutes of their choice. They enjoy being considered one of the very few individuals who can offer free legal advice to the people even while they are in the nascent stage of getting a degree. It doesn’t often happen with other courses, making law one of the most interesting courses across the educational spectrum. 

However, studying law is not that easy. The law aspirants are required to explore extensive case readings and long assessments, among many other things. Here are some of the interesting facts regarding law courses: 

1. Cultural diversity at the campus: First and foremost, it doesn’t matter in which country you are studying, you’ll often find students from various parts of the world studying alongside you. If not from other countries, you’ll surely get students from many other states of your country learning alongside you. Such a system plays an instrumental role in shaping the future of an individual by boosting his confidence and instilling a sense of respect for the citizens from other races and places.

2. An exciting schedule: The law society is often the most active and organized among all societies, especially at the campus. The to-do-list of a law student will always be filled with networking events, law balls, moots and debates. They are required to join many events to get a complete understanding of what the future beholds for them. For instance, the students at Bharati Vidyapeeth University have a lot more to access than the basic academic syllabus, which plays a pivotal role in the holistic development of the young aspirants.  

3. A course for the vulnerable: One of the best things about studying law is that one gets to know how the perception of this particular field in society is completely different from reality. It fascinates the students to know that the lawyers also work for small firms, vulnerable people and other such individuals, other than batting for the big shots, a viewpoint that is often showcased in the media. As a law student, you will understand how much importance is given to serving the society during and after the completion of the course. 

4. Pushing boundaries: Law is one of the rare fields that affects almost all the dimensions of human life and studying it pushes you to develop an interest in almost everything. One has to have a keen eye about all the segments, from geopolitics to international law, economics to sociology, etc. This is where a law student is able to work distinctly from other individuals.

Law has an important role to play in our lives. It can make or break our progress to achieve holistic growth in life. Similarly, the students also have a lot to work with, once they enter a law institute to study the course of their dreams. As a result, it encourages and excites generations, instead of burdening them with boring literature.

Why increased awareness is important to establish a robust and free legal aid system

There are not many people in India who are fully aware of the country’s legal system. Limited knowledge of constitutional rights is the result of economic and social backwardness. The services of legal counsel are not accessible to them due to this helpless situation prevailing in many areas across different states.

In a bid to provide free legal aid to deserving sections of the society, the Indian parliament has come up with a Directive Principle viz. Article 39-A by 42nd Amendment of Constitution in 1976. Access to free legal aid is a constitutional right and not just a modern concept.

Similarly, access to justice is a basic human right conferred by the common law. Preservation of the rule of law is necessary for the existence of the society. It implies giving free legal aid to the poor, who cannot afford the services of a lawyer, making it possible for them to seek justice, which is otherwise not possible.

The aim is to provide equal justice to the strong, as well as the weaker sections of the society. The laws of all the countries across the continent guarantee free trials for those who come in contact with the judicial systems.

Over the years, a number of steps have been taken to achieve more responsive and effective judicial system. Legal awareness can empower people to demand justice and effective remedies at all levels. Illiteracy, poverty and unconsciousness are the biggest problems in India. However, nowadays the youth is inclined towards learning the laws, legal aid and rights of the citizens.

A number of young students across the country are pursuing law in different institutes like Bharati Vidyapeeth’s New Law College, Pune. This is an encouraging sign, not only for those students, but for the nation at large. Each and every citizen of the country deserves to know about his rights, making it easier for him to approach the law and seek justice, whenever required.

The delivery system for legal aid is not that efficient in our country. It is high time for the authorities to assist these young students and lawyers to campaign and deliver free legal aid. It is not possible for the legal aid movement to achieve its goal, unless the people are not aware of their rights. Thus, the only path to a robust free legal aid system is an increased awareness among the masses.

India gets new Education Policy after 34 Years

The Cabinet on July 29 gave its nod to the National Education Policy that will bring far reaching changes in the school education and higher education systems.

The Cabinet on July 29 gave its nod to the National Education Policy. Consequently, the Human Resource Development Ministry has been renamed as the Ministry of Education.

“The education policy has been changed after 34 years and this is a historic moment,” said Environment, Forest and Climate Change Minister Prakash Javadekar.

The National Education Plan proposes far-reaching changes in the system of education not only in India. It also wants a self-sufficient domestic ranking system for Indian educational institutes.

Flexible entry and exit into higher educational institutions

Under the new system, flexibility will be given to students both in choosing the subjects for education as well as in the entry and exit in college degree programmes.

Any student can exit a degree programme from the first year onwards if he/she wants only a certificate. Once two years are completed, a diploma will be awarded and post the completion of the three-year or four-year curriculum, the degree will be awarded.

No rigid subject system for arts, science or commerce

The National Education Policy will put a thrust on use of mother tongue as medium of instruction till the fifth grade. Further, subjects wouldn’t be restricted to students purely based on their educational background.

This means an engineering student could study a course in History while a humanities student can take Physics or Mathematics as a subject. This will be allowed in both schools and colleges. This means that the entire academic curriculum will be over-hauled to allow transfer of credits between subjects and disciplines.

Further, M.Phil programme will be discontinued. Students can also do a four-year degree programme, one-year Masters and then directly go to the doctoral programme.

School education reforms

There will be a five plus three plus three plus four system. Here, the first five years will be focussed on the getting strong foundational basics. Then the next three years will be focussed on exploring various subjects of education.

It is just a change in pedagogy and not change in the curriculum. From Class VI, students can also get access to areas like coding that will be essential for their academic future.

There will not be a difference between academics and extra curricular activities. Hence, this means that sports activities will be given equal importance as say English or Mathematics.

School students will also get an opportunity to do vocational education programmes under the new policy from the sixth grade. So, a student could be sent to a local carpentar or artisan to understand their work patterns and skill-sets.

Single regulator for higher education

Instead of having different regulatory bodies like All India Council for Technical Education, University Grants Commission and other local niche entities, there will be one single higher education regulator.

This includes legal education and medical education as well. There will be an independent board of governors and a graded autonomy system will be launched.

Reference: Money control

 

CBSE XII Results 2020 to be Declared Today? Arts, Commerce And Science Students Can Check Their Scores at cbse.nic.in

CBSE Result 2020: The Central Board of Secondary Education (CBSE) is likely to release the results for class XII examinations on Monday. If reports are to be believed, the board will announce the results for Arts, Commerce and Science on its official result portal– cbse.nic.in today.

Though an official confirmation regarding the same is awaited, sources close to the board have said that students can check their expect the results by noon. A result link will be active at the website, once the results are declared.

Speculations are rife that CBSE won’t release the merit list and toppers’ list this year. “Coming up with a merit list makes no sense as the results are being calculated on the basis of an evaluation method due to the outbreak of COVID-19 pandemic”, a senior board official had told The Print yesterday.

How to Check CBSE Result 2020: 

Step 1: Login to the official website– cbseresults.nic.in or cbse.nic.in
Step 2: Enter your exam details like roll number and date of birth.
Step 3: Check your CBSE Board results for classes 10th and 12th.

Can You Check Your Scores on Google? 

CBSE hasn’t made any announcements in this regard as of now. Last year, the board had made arrangements so that students can download their results from Google.

World Day against Child Labour: No Reason, No Excuse, Child Labour is a Child Abuse

In today’s era of modernised world, the growing concerns about the number of children, who instead of going to schools and playing with loved ones, are being forced to work for their survival is threatening. Rather than having healthy food and playing with toys, they are handed over a hammer and chisel to earn a living.

Hundreds of millions of young girls and boys face adverse consequences due to hazardous and abusive working conditions. To prevent children from such deadly traps, in the year 2002, the International Labour Organization (ILO) announced to observe the World Day against Child Labour on June 12 in order to take necessary actions for eradicating this issue in all its forms and make children free. The day unites various governments, employers and civil society and masses from around the world to highlight the agony of child labourers and finding ways to resolve it.

As per the legal experts, with years of experience working at New Law College Pune, “Child labour is preventable. In India, rules are very strict when it comes to child labour. As per the Child and Adolescent Labour (Prohibition and Regulation) Act, 1986, it is completely prohibited to employ a child labour (i.e. a person below the age of 14 years) in any sort of factory or establishment, whether it is hazardous or not. A child is only allowed to work in order to help a family enterprise.”

Child labour in most of the cases is horrific, as children are being enslaved, separated from families and exposed to serious hazards and abusive work surroundings. Now, in the wake of COVID-19 pandemic, it is feared that the health crisis can thrust millions of vulnerable children into the trap of atrocious child labour. Children are now at even greater risk of facing harsh circumstances that will lead to more difficult conditions and long working hours. Presently, there are around 152 million children who are working, out of which 73 million are employed in health hazardous industries.

Based on a survey, legal researchers working closely with New Law College Pune revealed that every day children are being pushed into forced labour, illicit activities such as drug trafficking and prostitution as well. Thus, it is necessary for everyone to take cognizance of the matter to help the sufferers and nip this major concerning issue in the bud.

Indian labour laws in light of COVID-19| BVP New Law College, Pune

The crisis of COVID-19 has opened scope for a number of discussions on labourers and laws associated with them. The global pandemic has forced many factories to shut down, leaving labourers in the country with no jobs.

Thousands of migrant workers have been returning from metropolises to their home states. While this might bring some sort of labour shortage in industrialist states such as Karnataka, Delhi, Maharashtra, Kerala, etc., states like Bihar, Uttar Pradesh, Jharkhand, etc. might find it difficult to feed all those workers who have returned to their home states.

From legislature to executive to judiciary, all three governing components of the constitution are currently working on a framework that could bring labour stability in the country. In a recent development, Gujarat, Uttar Pradesh, and Madhya Pradesh suspended most of the labour laws for three years in order to fetch more investments to the states. While the government is doing its bit,let’s understand what labour laws in India look like.

Indian Labour Law in the Constitution The Constitution of India places labour as a subject in the concurrent list, which comes under both the union and state governments. India’s labour law is considered highly restrictive for companies, since it sought to give higher order of protection to workers. Labour rights are mentioned in articles 14-16, 19(1)(c), 23-24, 38, and 41-43A of the Constitution. Pune-based Bharati Vidyapeeth New Law College’s lecturer of constitutional studies states, “Article 16 specifically talks about the right of equality of opportunity for employment, while 19(1)(c) gives them the right to form associations or unions.”

In addition to various other laws, the 2008 Unorganised Workers’ Social Security Act adds coverage of life and disability benefits, old age protection, health and maternity benefits for unorganised workers. Whether the abolition of labour laws in various states will hold its nerve and stay in practice or not is a matter of time. However, what can be told with certainty is that India’s labour laws are strictly in favour of workers.