Tag Archives: coronavirus pandemic

TOP Ten countries kept out Covid-19

Coronavirus has been labelled a pandemic but a handful of countries have not yet reported any cases.

Territories with confirmed cases of COVID-19

Scientists, health officials and governments across the world have encouraged citizens to practise physical distancing and to avoid going out unless for necessary purposes.

According to data compiled by Johns Hopkins University, more than 23.7 million people have been infected, and the global death toll is at least 814,000. More than 15 million patients have recovered.

Here are a few countries that have not reported any cases of the coronavirus so far:

Kiribati

Marshall Islands

Micronesia

Nauru

North Korea

Palau

Samoa

Solomon Islands

Tonga

Turkmenistan

Tuvalu

Vanuatu

 

Coronavirus Update: India tally crosses 900,000 mark; 540 deaths in one day

Coronavirus latest news: Total number of cases in India has now crossed the 900,000 mark. Maharashtra has 260,924 cases, Delhi 113,740, and Tamil Nadu 142,000. 

Coronavirus India Update:

India has recorded over 28,000 new cases in a day to take its total number of Covid-19 cases to 907,645. This is the third consecutive day when India has recorded over 28,000 new cases. The country’s death toll stands at 23,727. Maharashtra has seen a spike of 6,497 cases in the past 24 hours, while Delhi has added 1,246 cases to its tally.

Coronavirus World Update:
As many as 13,236,252 people have been diagnosed with Covid-19 around the world so far. While more than 7,691,451 have recovered, 575,540 have died, according to Worldometer. 
Country-wise, the United States remains the most affected. It has recorded over 65,000 cases in a day and now has 3,479,483 coronavirus cases and 138,247 deaths. Brazil has 1,887,959 cases, and 72,921 deaths, while India is the third-worst-hit with 907,645 cases and 23,727 deaths.

Delhi Lockdown 4.0 guidelines: Here are all your questions answered

Nearly two months after a sweeping lockdown brought Delhi to a grinding halt, the city is set to reopen, with the local administration lifting curbs on markets, public transport, offices and construction activities.

Delhi Chief Minister Arvind Kejriwal has announced that his government will implement the latest guidelines issued by the Ministry of Home Affairs on easing restrictions, which have remained in force in the city of two crore since March 22.

What will open?

All shops in markets and shopping complexes have been allowed to open. In case of shops selling non-essential items, the odd-even policy will be followed, meaning that on a given day, half the shops in your neighbourhood market will function. However, there will be no such restrictions on shops selling essential items, such as kirana stores. This effectively means that all kinds of shops, including private liquor outlets, can now lift shutters. Government and private offices can also open with full staff strength. However, Kejriwal urged private business owners to encourage work from home for their employees.

Can I book a cab or an auto?

Yes. Kejriwal said the Delhi government has allowed cab aggregators and autos to restart services. This means your Ola and Uber booking apps will soon come back to life. However, not more than two passengers will be allowed in the cabs and autos.

Autos and taxis not attached with cab aggregators can also start plying, so can e-rickshaws and cycle rickshaws — with maximum one passenger each. People can also take out their private cars, with maximum two passengers. Pillion riding will not be allowed on two-wheelers.

What about buses and the Metro?

While buses will start operating with a maximum of 20 passengers, Metro services will remain suspended, at least till May 31, when the current phase of the lockdown ends. All public transport facilities will have to be disinfected extensively at regular intervals, Kejriwal said.

Will restaurants open?

Yes, but only to provide home delivery or takeaway. Dining facility will remain suspended. Bars and pubs will also remain shut.

Can I finally go for a haircut?

No. Barber shops, spas and salons will have to remain closed, Kejriwal said.

What else remains shut?

Shopping malls in the city will remain closed. Schools, colleges, other educational institutes, cinema halls, auditoriums, places of worship, swimming pools cannot open either.

Stadiums and sports complexes will be allowed to reopen, but will remain out of bounds for spectators.

Social, political, religious gatherings won’t be allowed either. However, marriages and funerals can be held with maximum 50 and 20 guests respectively.

In containment zones, all kinds of activities will remain suspended.

Non-essential activities will not be allowed during the 7 pm to 7 am period, which means markets will have to down shutters by evening.

What about commuting between Delhi and Noida, Gurgaon?

Kejriwal said that as of now, only those attached with essential services, such as doctors, nurses, will be allowed to cross inter-state borders. A decision on regular commuting will be taken after talks with UP and Haryana, he said.

 

Why sports will never be the same after coronavirus?

As the sporting world grapples with the COVID-19 shutdown, we take a look at a number of ways in which our favourite sports might be affected after resumption.

First, there were denials. Secondly, sports administrators over the world started taking notice. Soon postponements followed with a promise to resume live-action soon. But as one after another, countries across the globe went into lockdown, hopes of seeing our favourite athletes on the field started diminishing further. Perhaps the most telling blow came when the Tokyo Olympics were postponed to the following year with no fixed date in sight. Coronavirus’ domination over the wide world of sports was complete. With no clarity as to when this crisis will be over, one thing is for certain: sports (including day-to-day life) will never be the same if and when the pandemic subsides.

With close to 4 million people being affected to date, the world stands at a crossroads, faced with the decision of jumpstarting the economy, while living under the fear of the novel Covid-19. Sports administrators are also increasingly grappling with questions regarding the future of various events and leagues across the world. There has been some good news recently in the form of the German Bundesliga declaring a May 16 restart while the England and Wales Cricket Board (ECB) planning to host West Indies for a full tour starting in July.

But even the most optimistic of sports fans would understand that unless and until a vaccine for the coronavirus is invented and is available for the masses, when and how sports will return to their pre-Covid-19 status is anybody’s guess. In this piece, we try to present a few key areas regarding popular sports which are set to undergo massive changes as they try to get back on track.

Stadium experience

Playing in front of empty stadiums is an idea that has been mooted by many since the onset of the pandemic and it seems the only logical way to restart play while ‘living with the virus’. With the risk of a contagion set to rule daily lives in the near future, most die-hard fans will also be a bit apprehensive about filling the stadiums. While it will certainly be a weird experience for the players and also for those watching on TV, there doesn’t seem to be a way out of this unless governments are able to strictly impose social distancing norms in big stadiums. A curious example, in this case, has arisen out of Taiwan a couple of days ago.

Recently, sports officials in Taiwan started to adjust to the new age by filling the stands with fake spectators instead of real ones, stocking locker rooms with bottles of sanitizer, and urging players and coaches to keep a distance.

Even if a handful of spectators are allowed inside the stadiums, it might lead to a reduction in prices of tickets, online subscription fees, and other services on offer as the sporting bodies would certainly want to win back their fans whichever way they can. Entry/exit protocols in and out of the stadiums might also see a drastic change in the form of biometrics as people would prefer a fast and seamless experience rather than security guards checking each ticket in person.

Fan engagement

With the lack of any live-action at the moment, there is no doubt that fans are currently hungry for more. But if the period under lockdown is anything to go by, players and teams all over the world have started finding new ways to keep their fans engaged. The sudden spike in Instagram Live sessions with athletes across sports is already a signal that more such ways of personalized fan-engagement are set to become the norm. While earlier fans had to be mostly dependent on news outlets to get a sneak-peek into their sports stars’ lives, the lockdown has ensured that almost every day some or the other player is coming closer to his followers by interacting with them directly – either via a Q&A session, online challenges, etc.

Innovations and rule changes

Necessity is the mother of invention and in the case of cricket, the fear of Covid-19 has already started a debate regarding whether it’s still appropriate to continue using saliva on the ball. For a game already grappling with fall in attendance figures, cricket could also see more innovations on the lines of T10 leagues or The Hundred. Similarly in other sports, multiple rule changes to avoid contact between players and keeping the fans sitting at home glued to their screens, are sure to bring much more innovation at a faster pace. Sevens Rugby is another example of such an innovation and more investors would come in and try to create more futuristic sports leagues to attract the public.

Player training

With athletes being consigned to their homes due to the lockdown, there is an increasing concern regarding whether they will be fit to perform when asked to. In this scenario, we might see a shift in the training approaches as they will have to be remotely monitored. Thus, training might become much more personalized and player-centric.

In the same vein, teams and sporting bodies would do well to remember the mental toll a pandemic could take on a player. Physios and mental conditioning coaches might have to be on their toes, more actively than before and design regimens that cater to the needs of each player.

Restart yes! But when?

As of May 5, more than 150 sports events have been either postponed/cancelled since the beginning of the Covid-19 pandemic. While there was no choice for the sports federations to do so, one of the biggest questions facing them is that of when these events will be held eventually. A number of World Championships and global events like Olympics have been postponed till further notice but there is bound to be a clash between the dates of most of these proposed events.

Scheduling is going to be under focus also as the qualifying rounds for the above events are also set to be compromised with there being no sunset date in sight as far as the Covid-19 is concerned. How sports administrators are going to deal with these issues is a factor that is going to define the future course of sports all over the world.

This is not an exclusive list of the upcoming changes as there is a lot of information that needs to be processed over the next few months before some of these tweaks see the daylight. Until then, we can go back to our Zoom calls and Insta Lives trying to make sense of a situation that doesn’t seem to be making any sense at all.